Most employers nowadays offer some form of mental health awareness in the workplace, but is enough being done to address the implications that the menopause can cause?  The menopause can arguably be closely linked to Mental Health, considering it can lead to anxiety and depression and can affect every woman differently.

The menopause can have affect women emotionally and physically, as well how they perform and interact with colleagues and customers in the workplace, which can affect their absence levels and work productivity.  Some of the more common symptoms include night sweats, insomnia, lack of concentration and forgetfulness which can lead to problems with work performance, difficulties in making decisions and a decrease in an employee’s confidence levels.  Therefore, providing a supportive and understanding culture could potentially lower the Employer’s risk of a claim for sex discrimination under the Equality Act 2010.

Employment Tribunals

The first successful employment tribunal concerning the menopause was in 2012 and was in the case of Merchant v BT plc whereby the employee alleged that she had been discriminated against on the grounds of her gender when her employer failed to deal with her menopause symptoms in the same way that it would have dealt with other medical conditions. The employment tribunal held this discriminatory and unfair and said that a man suffering from ill health with comparable symptoms from a medical condition (in this particular case, affecting concentration) and with performance issues would not have been treated in the same way.

Previous case law has recommended that employers should take medical information into account in situations of capability and employers tend to seek advice from an employee’s GP and / or Occupational Health.

Considering more woman in the UK are now returning to work after having children and working later in life, employers would be wise to put in place the means to support their female employees through menopause transition.

How can employers help?

There is much advice and support for employers available and Solve. Can offer your business support when a women is going through the menopause.  Below are some useful hints and tips to get you started: –

  • Highlight menopause as part of a wider occupational health awareness campaign, so that all employees know that their employer has a positive attitude to the issue and that it is not something women should feel embarrassed about as well as providing guidance on how to deal with the menopause.
  • Sickness absence procedures should make it clear that they are flexible enough to cater for menopause-related sickness absence. Women should experience no detriment because they may need time off during this time.  Employers may choose to record sickness related to the menopause as an ongoing health issue instead of a series of short-term absences, which will ensure that the Absence Management Procedure will not be invoked unnecessarily and in turn will provide peace of mind to employees when discussing their health concerns.
  • Raise awareness amongst your leadership and management team of how menopause symptoms may affect women in the workplace.
  • Provide women in the workplace with information on how they can get support for any issues that arise as a result of the menopause. Because of the way society treats the menopause, many women will feel uncomfortable going to their line manager, especially if it’s is a man, and other options should be available. This may be through human resources or a welfare officer. Many employers have Employee Assistance Programmes that can act as a go-between and therefore, employers should communicate their Employee Assistance Programme (EAP).
  • Where possible, aim to accommodate flexible working requests that will help women manage their symptoms, which can include exhaustion, anxiety and depression because of sudden changes in their hormone levels.
  • Consider giving employees the means to adjust the temperature e.g. provide a fan, ensure that employees take their rest breaks, and provide cold drinking water.
  • Where appropriate, refer female employees to occupational health.  And ensure that managers are aware of reasonable workplace adjustments that may be necessary to support women who are experiencing the menopause.
  • Promote physical activity, making full use of wellbeing opportunities as an added value benefit by some healthcare and group risk providers.

For help and guidance on any health related concerns, contact us at Solve.